Heat management in dogs: Some essential reminders

The dog is an endothermic animal, that is to say it has a thermoregulation system and its internal heat must be constant. In view of this, there must be a constant balance between heat production (thermogenesis) and heat dissipation (thermolysis), just as it is happening to man. The temperature of the dog is around 38.5 ° C and the variations are very poorly tolerated by their body!

How panting Helps in Heat Management

The peculiarity of dogs, compared to human beings, is that they possess very little sweat glands; housed at the pads, their surface is not enough to regulate the temperature of the dog. This is why they are panting continuously or almost all the time in order to stabilize their metabolism.

It can be stated that the more dry the  air is, the more effective the panting is, and the more humid the air, the lower the transfer.rate.

The Role of Conduction and Radiation in Heat Management

Conduction and radiation maximize heat loss via the epidermis, this is less effective but nevertheless necessary, . It is not sweat but simply a loss of energy by contact or radiation. Apparently during hot weather, the dog’s blood system promotes blood transfers via peripheral channels rather than internal networks to maximize losses.

Heat Management in Dogs: Behavior

Be that as it may, the best solution developed by dogs lies in obvious behavioral mechanisms. Looking for shade, cool, feeding in the warmest hours, higher drink intake, etc.

Helping your dog manage the heat

It’s all about common sense … But since it’s especially when you’re not suspicious that accidents happen, stay alert!

REMINDER: If your dog is brachycephalic, black, sick, overweight, elderly or unaccustomed to heat, be especially on your guard.

Here are some points to observe (this is not exhaustive):

1. Try to give him water to drink. (No ice water)

Wet your dog if you can, with water at room temperature and / or bathe it wherever possible. For those who do not have this opportunity , there are refreshing blankets and coats for dogs that are sensitive or obliged to withstand the heat (apartments, vacations, etc.)

2. Take your dog out at times when the the sun is not at its peak (before 10 am and after 5 pm)

3. Make your dog stay in shaded areas as much as possible.

4. Avoid bituminous soils that can be very hot.

 

The heat stroke.

Heat stroke can cause serious brain damage and even death of your dog, if you fail to quickly recognize it, and give it the required attention. If your dog has the following symptoms, he may be a victim from a heat stroke:

Rising heart rate and breathing: Excessive gasping, foam, drool

Rising body temperature, or  hot body

Unusual: search for freshness

Appearance of involuntary movements: convulsions, tremors

Loss of consciousness: dizziness, fainting

Blue / gray mucous membranes

In the case of heat stroke – What to do?

Stay calm but do not waste time to respond. .

Do not force your dog to get up. Place him in the shade.

Moisten or cover him with a damp cloth.

Try to give him water to drink, but not to excess.

Ventilate the air around him if possible.

Call your veterinarian re or the nearest veterinarian.

Conclusion

Heat management is essential in the summer season and is mainly based on common sense. Be extremely vigilant if your dog is in his first days of heat. Follow these simple rules, and if your dog does not return to normal consult a veterinarian urgently.


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